GCSE exam

Will I pass my GCSE exam? The question that so many young students ask themselves before they head into that hall to sit down and face their doom! It’s an interesting juncture to ask yourself such a question, considering that is the one time (except for after the test) that you could probably do something to change the outcome of the answer. Yet there you are, lined up in silence, only wondering now whether or not you will pass!

It’s also a question I get asked a whole lot as a tutor and a former secondary school teacher. ‘Sir, will I pass my GCSE exam?’. Hmm, let me just dip my head into the future for a second and see. There’s no way I could know, you may have performed well in class all year, but that does not ensure you will give the examiner what they want.

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You might have skipped your cereal and revised all morning from your textbook, but if that information wasn’t already in there, how can you be sure it will be now after trying to cram it into your head? This post will hopefully help you to answer this question, whether you’re just wondering about whether you’ll pass a month before the GCSE exam. Or you’re turning frantically to Google to plead for an answer to the question: Will I pass my GCSE exam?

Do you know your material?

People that get A*’s don’t just think that Crooks’ is a symbol of the oppression men and women of different races experienced in the early 1910’s. They KNOW that Crooks’ is. People that get top marks in maths don’t just think that the square root is of 900 is ‘somewhere around 20 or something’, they KNOW that it is 30.

Because, the English student has become so familiar with the text of Of Mice and Men, that they know for sure that Crooks’ is a symbolic character. And they know because they’ve studied the context of the time the book was being written, and they’ve studied, not just Crooks’ quotes but the quotes about Crooks’ from other characters and they have made it their objective to understand the character. A slight idea about what a character might represent does not help you that much when it comes to the test. You need to be sure of yourself.

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The maths student knows the answer is 30 because he has studied the process of finding a square root repeated times, so he doesn’t just know the answers off by heart, but he knows the actual formula to! Knowing the material you are studying is not good enough, you have to have an understanding of it, you have to have it saved somewhere in your head.

Knowing the material you are studying is not good enough, you have to have an understanding of it, you have to have it saved somewhere in your head.

There are University PhD students that spend years and years writing about one book. But their essay is often amazing, because they KNOW their material.

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Are you worried?

If your palms are starting to sweat and you find yourself feeling a bit flustered or panicked just before you get into the test, you should give yourself a pat on the back. That is your mind trying to show your body how important and stressful the situation is.

But this is good, if you are worried or anxious before going into a test, it means that on some level you must understand the seriousness of the situation, combined by the passion and desire to have success. Worrying can keep your mind alert and ready and this is the best sort of state of mind to go into a test with. So, for want of a better phrase, don’t be worried if you’re worried… if that makes sense!

Worrying can keep your mind alert and ready and this is the best sort of state of mind to go into a test with. So, for want of a better phrase, don’t be worried if you’re worried… if that makes sense!

Do you feel ready?

Close your eyes and focus on yourself just before you go to line up for the test. Are you hungry or thirsty? Did you shower the morning of the test, or the night before? Is there something playing on your mind? Are you sad or upset for any particular reason?

All of these things can result in you not being ready for your test. And you wouldn’t want anything to ruin your exam experience, even something as big as family trouble, or something as small as being hungry. Please be prepared! Eat a good breakfast the day of the test so you there’s no way you can be distracted by hunger or thirst! Get plenty of sleep as this will help your brain to function.

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And if there is something serious on your mind, you could tell a member of stuff a sufficient amount of time before the GCSE exam, they might be able to help you out by allowing you to do it under more personal conditions. But how you feel before you go into an exam is so important! It can really make the difference between a fail, and a pass!

Hopefully these tips will steer you (if you haven’t prepared already) into feeling that you will pass your GCSE exam. It’s always good to strive to do better and better by telling yourself you might not pass, but if you’ve studied hard, eaten a good breakfast and rid your mind of any trouble, and you’re still feeling worried, that is probably a good sign!

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